Rabbit Hole

How to work with user stories in Jira? 🗂

Jira is a good tool for managing the product backlog for the development team. However, it is important to keep a tight backlog with only relevant items, and user stories often go through an early phase where it is not clear whether they are relevant. Therefore, use your judgment, and only add user stories to the backlog in Jira when you want the team to spend time on them, i.e. when you start to feel quite confident that it is something you would want to build.

Time to read: 7 minutes

Date: August 2021

Link: How to work with user stories in Jira? 🗂

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60 words summary:

In this article, Scott Castle (VP & GM at Sisense) shows us how we can use data other than A/B tests and clickstreams to build products with longer, more complex user flows. Given that so many of us work in Enterprise and B2B products, where the user journey is rarely simple or clear, Scott provides some more advanced methods for business analysis to help us make sense of product performance in a more complex environment.

Time to read:

6 Minutes

Publishing Date:
July 2020

Link to the article:
When A/B Tests Aren’t Enough! 🧪

Meme of the day

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60 words summary:

A lot of teams obsess about getting everything perfect for product launch day. The ultimate goal of a product launch is to demonstrate its unique value proposition to your target audiences and establish your product’s presence in the market. The product launch itself is just a moment of transition in your wider product journey. A product launch strategy must include clear choices you are making regarding your target market, your value propositions, sales motions, pricing & packaging, customer success plans, and org readiness. Approach your product launch with this mentality and you can both measure and maximize its impact effectively.

Time to read:

6 Minutes

Publishing Date:
February 2021

Link to the article:

5 Truths of Building a Product Launch Strategy 🚀

Meme of the day

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60 words summary:

It is common for organizations to have a Product Roadmap, which is a list of features along a timeline for their delivery. Agile on the other hand is about iteration. Doing something, ideally quickly, seeing how it went, and then looking to improve it. But if you’ve already defined your upcoming features in a Roadmap and have the next 6–12 months planned out when do you have time to iterate? Roadmaps are thus in conflict with some of the basic principles of Agile. Thus, in the end, the author suggests an alternative approach.

Time to read:

5 Minutes

Publishing Date:
January 2019

Link to the article:

Product Roadmaps: An Anti-pattern To Agile? 🛣

Meme of the day

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60 words summary:

In the below, article product managers will learn how to gain deeper insights into their end users, understand the customer experience, and develop a better product along with a customer empathy map. Customer empathy maps are a great collaborative tool that can serve as a visual reminder of your user’s mindset as they encounter your product or service, and can help product teams gain a deeper understanding of the various personas and ideal customers that they are trying to attract.

Time to read:

7 Minutes

Publishing Date:

January 2021

Link to the article:

How To Create A Customer Empathy Map? 🗺

Meme of the day

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60 words summary:

As product people, we all have been practicing building the right products rightly, yet if we look around, we find features, processes, and products that aren’t functioning well. This article is an overview of a five-step approach, a trigger list, that a product team can refer to identify and kill such non-functioning product zombies. We seldom discuss discontinuing a feature/product as passionately as creating new ones. Proactively identifying and killing the product zombies is as essential as incepting new ones.

Time to read:

7 Minutes

Publishing Date:

February 2022

Link to the article:

Killing Product Zombies: A Five-Step Approach 🧟‍♂️

Meme of the day

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60 words summary:

Essentially, a PRD defines the product you are going to build, its purpose, features, and functionality. An aspect of the PRD that is problematic is what is implied by the word “Requirements”. The role of the PM is to a large extent that of a requirements gatherer, who hands down a list of requirements to the development team and is less involved in the process after that. The author suggests using the term “Feature Document” instead of “PRD”. Read the article to find out why?

Time to read:

7 Minutes

Publishing Date:

March 2022

Link to the article:

The Dethroning of The PRD By Agile Feature Documents 👑

Meme of the day

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Rabbit Hole

Rabbit Hole

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